Lesson Testimonials

Hi Bahb,
Thank you so much for all of your help. I am on the verge of playing as well as I ever have. I wouldn’t be here without your help.
Tim Gillispie
Hi Bahb,
Made it back in one piece after getting a flat tire in the middle of nowhere on Interstate 80.  I was near a small convenience store where I was able to buy a can of fix a flat that enabled me to get home.
I’d like to thank you for a great day. You were very informative and helpful to me and it was great hearing about your experiences.  You’re a great player Bahb and an inspiration to me. I think what you’ve taught me is going to change my life as a trumpet player.  Thanks again for your time and knowledge.  I’ll keep you informed of my progress if that’s ok with you.
Jim

Hi Bahb, thanks for spending time during our lesson helping me out.  Things are going way better now really just trying to get that centered sound, einsetzen / ansetzen concept going… this is helping a lot.  Range and accuracy are improving.  It was great to hear you play as well!  Talk to you later, Drew
Hi Bahb,
Good to hear from you.  TCE continues to work well for me.  I get a lot of compliments for my sound and my endurance is getting better every day.  The band has quite a few gigs coming up and the Butler Symphony is doing some nice gigs.  We played a concert in every elementary school in the Butler School District two weeks ago.  That was 11 gigs in 4 days.  The Trinity Jazz Orchestra is about to release our first CD in a few weeks.  I’ll send you a copy when we get them.  Great to hear about your Skype teaching.  I’ll be sure to spread the word.
Jim
Bahb,  I am sure that the videographers got the “Ablassen” as I played that to announce the procession of the bride (Trumpet Voluntary).   When I get it, I’ll be sure to pass it on.I am not sure what I was thinking when I agreed to do this – there were many emotions going on.  Not the smartest or easiest thing I’ve ever done. One guy I work with said it sounded better than Wynton – blowing a little sunshine I think.  But I was happy with it.
I have a Vivaldi Gloria coming up and then my usual Nine Lessons and Carols.  It’s good to be busy.
Best, Tom
 Bahb,
Just played my oldest son’s wedding.  Mouret “Rondeau”, Reiche “Ablassen “, Purcell “Trumpet Voluntary”, Clarke “Trumpet Tune”.  No pressure. Never did the Reiche before.  Centered all the arpeggiation.
Thanks!  Be in touch soon Tom

Oh I see. Well this articulation should help because you said my tongue was detatching in the recording. I am going to practice the DuGu articulation as well as the slur and staccato. I look forward to our next lesson. Jacob.

Hello Mr. Civiletti. I have been doing the exercises diligently. Do the slur and staccato exercises create muscle memory to keep the tongue forward too? Do these exercises build range as well? I am just trying to understand the difference in exercises.

Jacob

Hello Mr. Civiletti. I have been working on the the pedals like you said. When it comes to fast lip trills, the upward movement of my tongue is suppose to do them right and not my lips?

Jacob

Correction.My MPT leader(music performance team leader.He is the head of all the squads in my platoon) keeps saying that I am sounding better. Thank you for the worksheet. I will get started on it immediately.

Jacob

My squad leader keeps telling me that I am sounding better; therefore, I really appreciate what you have taught me so far.

Jacob

Bob….Hi!

Hope all is well. Do you remember me? I had a lesson at you home a couple of years ago. My range has improved greatly because of that lesson. I now own….hi “F”. I still want more!!!

Lagrangeville N.Y.

SHALOM….Howard

Hello Mr. Civiletti,

Jodie Here! I have been trying out the method occasionally when I warm-up, using both Einsetzen and Ansetzen exercises you showed me. I have tried using the TCE embouchure in pit orchestra rehearsals for the show Gypsy in a few weeks and I have tried it with my excerpts for my ensemble auditions this coming Fall. I have come to notice that my tongue naturally goes to the top of my bottom lip without having to think about it  now. I think before I heard about your method, my tongue was somewhere in the right place because it did not seem like a huge change for the new embouchure. I have noticed the biggest difference in the way I have been playing on of my audition excerpts. I have to play the entire second movement of the Haydn Concerto for Trumpet. Using TCE everything is smooth and at the dynamic I was looking for. The highest notes come out with such ease. It is exciting. As of right now, I have noticed the greatest difference between my embouchure and TCE in the big classical pieces for trumpet. What is supposed to soar and sound smooth sounds a lot more like that when I use TCE as opposed to my original embouchure.

Max and I were practicing together a few times and sometimes it is still hard to hear the difference between our original embouchure’s and when we use TCE. We are looking at another lesson possibly the week of August 10-16th.
Thanks, Jodie

Hi Bahb,
Just touching base with my progress.  I’ve been faithfully practicing every day since my lesson with you and am making significant progress.  I haven’t really attempted anything high but have been working on keeping tongue touching lower lip. My sound is getting stronger as well as my endurance.  I played a fairly difficult baroque piece in church last week on the D trumpet and had many compliments on my sound.  As a matter of fact I got a standing ovation from the congregation and it was just a prelude piece!
I’m also teaching my students the TCE system.  Most of them are still in elementary school so I’m just trying to get them to learn the spit-buzz and to keep their tongue against the lower lip.
I have two high school age students who are fairly good players.  One of them has already e-mailed you and will be ordering your books.  When I got home from my lesson with you, I discovered that I had already purchased one of your books, along with a DVD a couple of years ago so I’m giving that book to the other student.  His family is struggling financially so this will help him out.
This month I’ll begin working on the range aspect of TCE.  Thanks again for your help.
Jim
Bahb,
Thanks for the great lesson. I am feeling like with a little time and effort my playing will change. I need to go back and refresh my memory on fingerings, etc. but I think that will come quickly.
To clarify my long term goals – I want to play in church, community band, etc. but would like to get my range into double high C over the next few years.
Once I get the materials I will go through them and schedule some more lesson time with you.
 Brent.
Mr. Civiletti,
Jodie and I are very interested in taking Skype lessons. We would be using Jodie’s account for about two or three individual lessons. As for the duration of the lessons, we have decided to start off with Jodie having an hour lesson and me (Max) having a half hour lesson. Then for our next lesson we would switch who gets the hour. If we were to become more advanced using your method, would it be necessary to purchase a TCE mouthpiece? Would the mouthpiece make the method any easier?
Thanks,
Max  & Jodie
Hi Bahb:
I practise the new embouchure since two weeks ago, and I am able to play to A”‘ with staccato. Skype lesson was very useful, and this technique is amazing! Thanks for everything
Best wishes, István
Hi Bahb,
The biggest problem I have with overblowing is times when I am playing in a band and cannot hear myself. I constantly tell myself that I’m loud enough, but I know I’m doing it!
It’d be good to organise a Skype lesson once I have your mouthpiece. I found your ’5 articulations’ DVD really useful.
Rich
Hello Mr. Civiletti. My name is Jacob Mcfadden, and I am currently serving as a trumpet player in the Army Band. I have been using the TCE method for some time now. I took in person and phone lessons with Jerome Callet and even took a lesson with Herb Smith who also uses the TCE method. However, I have not seen any progress with my range. My range is about an A above the staff, and it’s been a life- long desire to play double high Cs with ease. I would like to know how much will Skype lessons cost with you? Thanks
Hello Bahb!
I trust you are well.
I hope that, as they say -Pride does (not) come before a fall in this situation- but for the second day running I have actually managed to play 100 high C’s. Yesterday was not pretty, but today was better.
Finally, I managed to work out what was going wrong – and it was as simple as holding my cornet up straight and “playing correctly”. Where have I heard that before?
So, I am keeping at it and it finally feels as though I may be getting somewhere. Tenacity must be my middle name.
Thanks for all your help and encouragement.
David
I’d like to thank you for a great day. You were very informative and helpful to me and it was great hearing about your experiences.  You’re a great player Bahb and an inspiration to me. I think what you’ve taught me is going to change my life as a trumpet player.  Thanks again for your time and knowledge.  I’ll keep you informed of my progress if that’s ok with you.
Jim
Dear Mr. Civiletti,
I purchased your methodbook “Trumpet Secrets Vol. 1, The tongue Controlled Embouchure” in 2003 and started to practice this way. Before that time, I studied music at the Nuremberg Conservatory, Germany, and got a professional education in trumpetperformance there. I also got lessons with famous trumpet teachers, but never reached a satisfied embouchure, even I practiced and worked very hard. At this time I was desperated in my embouchure and hat nothing to lose.
When I started to learn about your knowledge, how described in your valuable book, things began to change. Today, I have an embouchure I can trust on. I perform regularly sophisticated concertos on the piccolotrumpet together with organ. I am able to play at least up to high g every day, sometimes up to double high c and the audience loves to listen to me. I know that you have called the piccolotrumpet a “bastardinstrument”, but for me, a dream has come true. It’s a fantastic experience that so many people want to listen to me, this makes me really happy.
So it’s a requirement for me to say thank you very much dear sir. The 60 Euros for your methodbook is one of the best investments of my life. You safed my life as a trumpetplayer.
Your loyal student
Andreas Boehm
Bahb- Thanks so much for the lesson. Definitely cleared up a bunch of stuff I was confused about. I think this manual will really help me to solidify things. Definitely admire your playing and being able to articulate your method in a clear manner. Gary E.
Hi Bahb,
I made it back from Bulgaria safe and sound yesterday. I feel compelled to write you because I want to deeply thank you for our Skype/telephone session on Tuesday. Sorry that the Skype connection was so unreliable – I think it was the WLAN from the hotel that was causing the problems.
Anyway, I found our session extremely valuable. I finally was able to work on the Einsetzen/Ansetzen technique on my trumpet last night. I don’t think I would have ever truly understood it without your personal instruction. I must admit that my first experiences last night were not so great. I can get a great double pedal buzz with the unfurled lower lip underneath and the top lip in the mouthpiece, and your tip about the tongue against the bottom of the lower lip during Einsetzen, sliding along and ending on the top of the lower lip in the Ansetzen position was very helpful. I believe I have the idea, but I need to work on being able to keep up the buzz when going up the harmonics when I slide the lower lip in without resetting the embouchure (one continuous motion and sound, like you). In other words, I can execute the Einsetzen (double pedal tones) and also the Ansetzen, but connecting the two is what I need to practice. I’m really glad, however, that I have a good starting point with the proper instruction, also with using the Monster Chops facial flex device.
I hope you had a nice Independence Day yesterday and I wish you much success on your tour starting tomorrow. I’ll keep you posted on my progress and will write again sometime in August.
Thanks again, Bahb, for your time, patience and for your dedicated effort.
Best regards,
Dana

Hi again Bahb!

I’ve been working since I received your package on Saturday trying out the TCE technique, using the instruction book(s) and your video of the five articulations. I feel I’m already getting pretty used to having my tongue forward, and I believe I’m not doing too bad with the spit buzz, for example, even if I might not be doing everything 100% correctly yet.

As for the monster chops dynamic resistance exerciser, I watched the demonstration video on your web site and “believe” I have the basic idea of the movement involved. The problem is that I don’t know whether I should flex and hold for a specific length of time, or simply flex repeatedly, or do a certain amount of repetitions, or how long and how often I should or should not work with the device.

At any rate, I’m further encouraged with my initial experiences with the TCE concept, and hope that I’m not too far off in my interpretation so far (as I wrote you before I received your package, I had been experimenting with the technique only using the information I could get from your web site.

Are you by chance planning another European tour? I would be interested in attending one of your clinics if you’re in the area.

Hope you’re doing well – best regards,

Dana

 

 Thanks  for the awesome lesson. I have some direction!!
I just ordered the  Monster chops  exerciser.

David P.

 

Testimonials from the Trumpet Forum regarding Bahb’s teaching.

Post Posted: Thu Oct 05, 2006 9:35 pm Post subject: My lesson with Bahb Civiletti Reply with quote
The following narrative of my time spent with Bahb Civiletti is something I want to share with all of the folks here on this forum who are interested in the TCE approach to trumpet playing. I don’t have an agenda or preconceived notion about any of the particular methods discussed here on this site – I only wish to relate my recent experiences.

I played trumpet up through high school, and went to a junior college on scholarship, earning an Associate In Arts degree in trumpet performance. I was a good player technically, and could play in a variety of settings, but I was not a lead player, and my lack of range and power was always a source of frustration for me. So, I stopped playing trumpet and got a MBA.

When I picked up the horn again after a 20 year absence to play casually (mostly church), I was again experiencing the frustration with my sound, consistency, and range. Fortunately for me and my family, I am making a very good living doing something entirely different! Trumpet for me is now a hobby – I don’t need to play it ever again, and I was at a point where I just might have done that.

I stumbled across the TCE concept by randomly following a link to the review of Jerome Callet’s seminar at the recent ITG conference in New Jersey. Reading the description of Callet’s approach to trumpet playing and his personal history piqued my interest. Searching the internet yielded his website, Bahb’s site, and of course the Callet forum here at the Trumpet Herald. I called Mr. Callet and had an initial consultation. He gave me some exercises to work on, and we arranged a follow-up phone lesson, and I ordered and received the Trumpet Secrets book. The phone lesson was interesting, but it left me wanting more of a traditional in-person coaching session. After following the posts at the forum here, I began to wonder if I should also contact Bahb.

Several days ago I emailed Bahb inquiring about his clinics and lessons and about any plans to be in the southeast in the near future. Bahb responded back right away, and it so happened he was taking a week’s vacation in Boca Raton, Florida. (Only 240 miles from me!) When I suggested an extended afternoon lesson, he immediately agreed.

On Tuesday October 3rd I drove down to meet Bahb. After 4 ½ hours on the road, I arrived at Bahb’s oceanside condo, not having had a formal music lesson for 20+ years, nervous as to what Bahb would try to teach, and if he would be able to help me. Bahb and Mrs. Civiletti were sitting by the pool when I arrived around 12:45p. My first impression of the couple was that they were very open, friendly, and gracious. Mrs. C left to do some shopping, and Bahb and I went into the condo, plunked down on a couple of couches, and pulled out our trumpets.

For the next 2 ½ hours, I sat astounded as Bahb conveyed a depth, breadth, and intensity of trumpet virtuosity, development, and knowledge that I had never experienced before.

Some vignettes from this incredible session:

• Demonstrating the importance of einsetzen / ansetzen to developing the fundamental TCE embouchure, and the basic sound articulations and attacks that develop the spitbuzz;

• Playing the piccolo trumpet parts of the Brandenburg concerto, twice, using a standard Bb trumpet. The first time soft, and the second time, as he put it, the “big band version [loud];”

• Demonstrating the use of TCE compression vs. air volume and velocity by playing a loud D above double C with the tuning slide detached so that I could observe the minimal air flow;

• Debunking all of the posture, air intake, and other trumpet myths for playing loud and high by rolling back on his couch and kicking his feet up in the air while playing double Cs;

All the while clearly conveying to me the key TCE fundamentals so that I could continue my development with a solid foundation. Throughout the lesson, Bahb communicated all of these things with passion, clarity, and good humor, checking constantly for my understanding of what he was explaining and demonstrating.

After the lesson, Bahb, Mrs. C, and I had lunch by the pool. Bahb continued to answer and discuss all of my follow up questions and comments – I felt I was still having an ongoing lesson with the experiences and observations that he shared. Around 5p, I realized I needed to get back on the road, and bade a reluctant goodbye to Bahb and his wife.

It is my hope and prayer that I can take these TCE techniques and use them to improve my trumpet playing. Bahb demonstrated with exceptional effectiveness that TCE works; the rest is up to me.
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Hercules.
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Bill Bryant
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 2006 10:31 pm Post subject: Reply with quote
Can you play a Clifford Brown solo or the Staigers Carnival of Venice or a lead line with the Gordon Goodwin big band while using TCE?

I used to do a thing with my chops back in high school that amazed everybody including me–double Cs and all that–but my secret was that I couldn’t tongue worth anything with that setting. From what I’ve learned of TCE it may have been what I did.

Is there an MP3 out there somewhere with somebody using TCE on some difficult tonguing and doing it well?
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oj
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2006 12:19 am Post subject: Reply with quote
Yes,

Bahb Civiletti has some CDs. I have several sound samples here:

http://abel.hive.no/trumpet/articles/buccina/

Btw, Ed. Tarr told me that he think Bahb has mastered all the different tonguings found in baroque trumpet technique.

Ole
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jonas quizman
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2006 3:08 am Post subject: Re: My lesson with Bahb Civiletti Reply with quote
hercules wrote:

• Demonstrating the importance of einsetzen / ansetzen to developing the fundamental TCE embouchure, and the basic sound articulations and attacks that develop the spitbuzz;

Hi hercules,

could you expand a bit on what Bahb said about einsetzen/ansetzen and how this relates to TCE?

Thanks!

jonas
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fox
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2006 6:06 am Post subject: Reply with quote
I too had a lesson with Bahb in Boca Raton just last night.

I would say that if you are interested in TCE then seeing Bahb is a great idea. I saw Jerry twice a few years ago. In contrast Bahb made things simple to understand and had me in the correct spit buzz position-something I was never quite sure I was doing right with Jerry.

If you want to see Jerry or have an opportunity, go for it. Then when you see Bahb you’ll get a slightly different take. One that involves more pedals (einsetzen) and how this applies to the spit buzz position in the normal playing range (ansetzen).

All in all, the lesson was informative, fun and I left with a very positive feeling; or as I told Bahb- enlightenment.

Doug
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bach
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2006 8:44 am Post subject: Reply with quote
Probably you already read this…

http://abel.hive.no/trompet/articles/callet

However, the article shows 2 photos of Callet playing double-pedal C (with Einsetzen) and double-high C (with Ansetzen).
OJ wrote that Callet showed how he can slide from double pedals to double-high notes, and back, combining the 2 old methods.
My question: does this mean that TCE needs a specific mpc placement and pivoting? Does Civiletti said something more specific?
I already asked in another topic and got a negative answer, but this article make me getting confused…
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fox
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2006 9:47 am Post subject: Reply with quote
bach wrote:
My question: does this mean that TCE needs a specific mpc placement and pivoting? Does Civiletti said something more specific?

I didn’t spend a lot of time talking about the pedals because I have done them for so long. I was told to play them louder with more upper lip vibration.

What Bahb did mention was that in going between the 2 settings they are the same except for the position of the bottom lip. Since going into the regular playing range requires you to move the bottom lip back into the cup this automatically changes your horn angle. You are not concentrating on pivot, just maintaining tongue position and moving the bottom lip back in. This is the proper placement for TCE. Of course, you need to know how to do a Callet pedal to start out.

The transition is a simple movement that can be made all too complicated because of how different it feels from “normal” or past playing habits. That’s my take on it anyway.
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hercules
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2006 3:08 pm Post subject: Reply with quote
Bill Bryant wrote: Can you play a Clifford Brown solo or the Staigers Carnival of Venice or a lead line with the Gordon Goodwin big band while using TCE?
***********

Bill -
I would recommend going to Bahb’s site, here- http://www.tce-studio.com/main.html?hq

- and listen to the sound clips of his playing. I think you would agree that the answer is yes to all of the above. As you can tell from Bahb’s sound clips, he is a virtuoso.

I would like to stress that I was not visiting with Bahb to learn more about trumpet literature or musicality; I was there to get some fundamental training to help me develop to play better. A good analogy would be Bahb was showing me how to do the proper form and regimen on barbells for a weight training program so that I can develop as an Ultimate Fighting Champion.
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hercules
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2006 4:45 pm Post subject: Reply with quote
Jonas wrote: could you expand a bit on what Bahb said about einsetzen/ansetzen and how this relates to TCE?
****************

Jonas -
What Bahb stressed to me about the pedal tones was that the exercises helped to develop the muscles between the nose and upper lip – he gave me the precise name of these muscles, but I didn’t write that down.

Also, he said that the einsetzen-to-ansetzen and back again would help evolve my TCE formation in a very deliberate way – not just the embouchure’s muscular development, but also tongue placement.

Of course, Bahb can explain this stuff a lot better than I can with my limited exposure.
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BrassClass
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2006 5:54 pm Post subject: Reply with quote
Hercules,

How much would the book be of help without a private lesson ?
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hercules
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2006 6:24 pm Post subject: Reply with quote
Brassclass -

I don’t know the answer to the question the way you framed it. My guess is “very little.” With a lesson, the information and feedback on your playing is immediate.
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Bill Bryant
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2006 6:25 pm Post subject: Reply with quote
I listened to Civiletti play Hot Canary and the other thing on B-flat. Then I listened to all the clips.

Even though Civiletti is obviously a good musician who plays very well, there’s something thick and “thwa-thwa” sounding about his articulation that I don’t care for. I wonder very seriously what he would sound like on the Staigers Carnival of Venice, or for that matter, on any triple tongue fanfare passage, or on fast bop lines.

Maybe these clips are not a good representation of Civiletti’s ability. I’m certainly open to correction, and I have no ax to grind at all. I just haven’t heard (yet?) the kind of clean, clear, positive, rapid articulation I associate with top level trumpet playing coming from anybody who has adopted the TCE approach. To those successful at it, it seems to help with range and stamina, but it seems to take away something too. Something very important.

It’s clear to me, at least for now, that, as nice as it would be to have an easy double C, I wouldn’t trade my sound and articulation down in the money register for Civiletti’s, even if I could add an octave or more to my range.

If Mr. Civiletti or Mr. Callet or anybody else who uses TCE would like to post some music files that would blow my opinion out of the water, I would be thrilled to be set straight on this. It’s a subject I’d love to be totally wrong about.
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hercules
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2006 6:49 pm Post subject: Reply with quote
Ah. We’re getting into old trumpet joke territory here. Not much has changed in 20 years.

Goodness, Bill – just email or call Bahb with your observations / concerns. He would be happy to discuss with you.
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Bill Bryant
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2006 6:53 pm Post subject: Reply with quote
hercules wrote:
Ah. We’re getting into old trumpet joke territory here. Not much has changed in 20 years.

??
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digs
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 06, 2006 7:01 pm Post subject: Reply with quote
Bill,

You present some good and tough questions. I don’t have the answers to your questions on multiple tonguing. I’m still working on it…

But, in all sincerity, I believe many people who seek out TCE and what it offers are individuals frustrated with some aspect of their playing, usually endurance, sound, and/or range. Honestly, if you are playing very well, and happy with your sound and technique in the money register, why even toy with the idea of changing something? In my opinion, that is not the profile of someone who seeks out and decides to implement TCE.

I’m not saying you should not look at it, I’m just asking why bother? Are you frustrated with one of the aspects of playing I mentioned? If so, fine. If not, don’t worry about it. TCE implemented is a huge change and a big committment. It’s not a trick. It’s a completely different approach. With that said, the biggest thing I’ve gained is a renewed joy for playing the horn. It is more enjoyable today than ever, and I credit TCE for this.

Again, my comments are made with complete sincerity, I mean no disrespect. If I had been happy with my playing, I never would have given TCE a second thought.

Wanted to thank you for the lesson last night. Boy, did the light go on and all my questions were answered when I *finally* got what the Einsetzen/Ansetzen was all about!! Getting the embouchure bunched up around the mouthpiece is what I think I was missing. Wanted to let you know Will check in after working with it for a while. Can’t wait for the embouchure developer tool to get in.

Best regards, Bill B.

Hi Bahb,

I’ve been applying the Monster Chops routines in my practice for a little over a month. The Facial Flex really develops the lip muscles quickly. The extra development allows me to gain better control of the lip muscles which makes the upper register much easier to play. It is like lifting weights. When you  lift weights and develop your chest, back, shoulders and arms you can flex them easier. You can feel the muscle fibers contract and control them. The system helped me get over the double A barrier. I own double C now. My endurance also increased significantly. It makes playing even more fun because I’m not worrying about what high notes are coming. I just play them.

Thank you my master.

Richie Dee

Robert. YOU ARE A GENIUS!! Monette, jonette, schmonette…. I currently own more than 250 trumpet mouthpieces, to include 4 Monettes, Custom jobs, Callets, Giardinelli, GR and many, many other “famous” and expensive pieces. THEY ARE ALL JUNK COMPARED TO YOUR TCE 3!!! I only had to read your literature for 10 minutes; practice a bit and I was hitting STRONG, clear and resonant double high Cs!!!

I cannot thank you enough! PLEASE use this in your site as a testimonial. I have been playing for 50 years and have tried everything and THE ONLY PIECE THAT REALLY WORKS IS YOURS!!! GOD BLESS YOU CUMPARE!

Claudio Gnoccihi
A New Subject of King Civilletti!!!

P.S. This is me PRIOR to your mouthpiece: http://www.thectsgroup.us/blog/ YOU WILL SOON HEAR THE NEW ME…. shall I play all the same tunes an octave higher? NOW I CAN!

Bahb
The lesson was great for my progress. The simple “press your tongue DOWN” has made a big difference in my consistently big sound. I still am not sure of the rolling the bottom tongue up. That will be for another lesson. My range is great. Hitting high “E” often without concern of strain. I am starting to hit high “F”‘s and a little of the high “G”. It seems that my tongue was getting in the way a lot.

Bill

Bahb,
Things are working much better. Range is great. Endurance is great. Sound is better. I played a three piece dance gig and the leader said I worked my ass off. I went hgih most of the night and with my very little tired lips.

Bill

Bahb
I’ve been working on the claw and keeping that same set throughout the instrument. I am focusing on that, not using so much air and working on keeping the tongue moving. I play higher and easier using this approach. I am also working on Einzetzen/Ansetzen up and down through the registers (challenging to do that one). Also, I am practicing scales up and down 2+ octaves using articulations. This is all working very well indeed.

Thank you for everything. Looking forward to our next lesson! Perhaps in a couple of weeks?

Take care.
God Bless.
Mark Weakley

Bahb,
I cannot thank you enought for the time you dedicated to me yesterday. You are a special gifted teacher! This morning was my best morning in years, as I followed/remembered your teachings on compression, resistance, and tongue controller. I started with my soft pianissimo line G and did as you instructed with the five articulations. I did this slowly (80 bpm) with conscious and concentrated and as my morning routine progressed great things began to happen. The mouthpiece is a great fit and the sound that I am getting, to me IS A BLESSING! I also would like to thank your wife for making me feel welcome. Please tell her that I said that I truly love the scheme of the home decorations. It is a clean gorgeous home! May God Bless you Bahb and your loved one, always.

Manny Candelario, B.S. M.I.S. A+ Net+ CCNA

I’m finding the Trumpet Secrets book very helpful and I feel that all these concepts are beginning to make sense. Thanks for your help and look forward to seeing you Friday.

Jerry

Awesome! Brilliant playing. Artful articulation. Wonderfully musicial and perfect intonation. Unbelieveable chops. Bravo! It’s amazing playing. Those lip trills and tasty articulation. Of course range and endurance is outstanding. The way you play you don’t notice the sheer physical demands. Sounds easy.

Alex Holton

Bahb Hey!
Just to give you feedback about our class. I’m using less air and I’m having great results. While playing the studies that you gave me. I realized that the high notes are even easier if I curl the tongue and think of the upper lip going down! It’s an amazing feeling of ease… intervals closer… is it possible to get that feeling on entire range? The TCE training manual could help me? This feeling is because of the tongue curl?

For me it was a very interesting workshop. It’s a “must have done” experience for everybody. I learned a lot of new things. Thank you. I was talking about a few pupils with serious problems. I’ll try it for a period by myself to solve it. If it won’t work I will contact you to “restore all the damage I’ve made…” ….joke..

For the future Bahb, if you are in the neighborhood, can you please let me know. I’ve a collective of at least 30 interested trumpet players who are very curious to meet you and your technic. So we can organize a workshop.

Thank you very much,
sincerely,
Chris

Hallo Bahb!

First of all I have to say thank you for your lesson in Ochsenhausen. I reflect a lot about your ideas of trumpet playing, and it acts! The only problem is that I have 2 wonderful children and I want to be a good Daddy, so I have not as much time for practicing as I would like…

I´m still a bit concerned about the sound of your TCE 2 mouthpiece, I thought it is to bright. But everybody hearing me playing says it is good! Even if I record myself it sounds bright but good!

So can you send me an pay-pal-request for both your mouthpiece and the “Trumpet Secrets” book of Jerry and you? I still don´t exactly know how it works….

When I´m practicing I look for:

  • a pure and centered sound
  • no duah articulation
  • not playing too loud, but pp
  • an anchored tip of the tongue at the bottom lip

Karl Murnauer

One person did send me a private message after I responded in the thread. Here it is:

Thank you for a comprehensive and informative post on TCE and Jerry Callet.

I have been in the forum for a long time and even purchased Jerry’s SC materials way back when. Even then I found the info to be vague and for the money, not very substantial.

I have continued to follow Jerry’s evolving work and have no doubt that TCE works (maybe not for all) but have resisted buying the materials largely because of the confusion of those who attempt it in the forum.

As with most things, the relentless and unquestioned support of Jerry for example, makes the outside viewer very skeptical of the teaching technique. Jerry’s method is ever evolving and at any given point in time is touted as the best there is. That is fine for light bulbs, but not so good for the many of us looking for a good, if not the “perfect” answer.

The one thing that has been consistent with my readings of Jerry’s techniques is the frustratingly vague language. I simply don’t understand the descriptive’s he uses and why they seemingly change for no apparent reason.

I don’t have the current materials, so my criticisms may well have been addressed. I do agree with you that Bahb has been unfairly treated in the thread.

Thanks for all of you well written posts!

I did respond to him and recommended him to give you a try. I hope he does because I know you can help him.

In the trumpet herald, in the Callet forum is a topic titled: “Bahb or Jerry”. As you know, people were comparing Callet with you. I also posted a comment and stated why I left Callet and take lessons from you. I explained why, that is, because of Jerome’s unclear teaching techniques. Kyle responded by editing my as well as others’ posts. Kyle also sent me a private message. Here is what he said:

MG, You have been posting in a forum dedicated to the instruction of Jerome Callet. When posts are over the line, as they clearly were in the last thread, they are going to be edited. If you make another attempt to stir up the pot then I will have to revoke your forum privileges. Lets not go that way. – Kyle

I then responded to him and this is what I said:

Kyle, I have received and read the pm from you. I have to say that it really puzzles me. Why? Because you say “that the forum is dedicated to the instruction of Jerome Callet”. That is all fine if you stick with just that. However, many times BAHB has been mentioned; and as I can see, you have allowed many threads continue on as long as it was to Jerry’s advantage. What is my point here? With your last action, that is, deleting and editing peoples posts in a thread, you have demonstrated yourself to be unfair. Then you have the nerve to threaten me if I “make another attempt to stir up the pot”. That puzzles me! Why? Because I had no clue that I stirred up something – especially when my post appeared well after 20 posts in the thread. The thread was a comparison between BAHB and Jerry. Did I not do that? Moreover, did you not put your two senses in? Yes, and you gave partial, biased information to make Jerry appear better than BAHB with selective, incomplete information. I say incomplete because you fail to bring out all the truths of Jerry. You well know Kyle that there have been numerous complaints about Jerry’s teaching techniques being unclear. Now when the truth comes out, as it did in that thread, you then manipulate the thread to suppress the truth for Jerry’s advantage. Totally unfair and biased. I write this to you because in no way I stirred up anything whatsoever. I simply made my point why I go to BAHB rather than Jerry. I never told anyone to leave Jerry. No! I in a fair way mentioned to try them both. Those are the only words you left in my edited post. Furthermore, I also mentioned positive things about Jerry – like how he treated me very fair. I did not bash anyone at all! I used polite language. If you are not going to face the truth and edit something when it is not to Jerry’s advantage, then you are conducting yourself as a manipulative forum moderator. I did stick to the topic, that is, comparing BAHB with Jerry. It is quite clear where you come from. You cease any opportunity to downgrade BAHB. You also over qualify Jerry – making him better than he really is. Although you think it is to Jerry’s advantage, it really isn’t. Why? Because you bring high expectations to an individual. Then when one finds out what he expected is not as great as he thought, great disappointed settles in. I have found this reported here from time to time. So you yourself are causing damaging results, whether you know it or not. I am not the only one tired of you misrepresenting BAHB. There others out there that feel the same way. Perhaps one of use should start a TCE forum to allow all topics to be discussed – exposing the whole truth about Jerry. You would never want that. Nor am I that kind of a person. My whole point is if that would happen, you would be getting a taste of your own medicine. Your ways of running this thread are drawing away people. Enough said. mg

Any way, I will not focus on this. I am just glad that I don’t base my decisions on peoples’ opinions. Nobody told me to try you. I found your website when I did a TCE search in Google. I am glad I made the change. I appreciate the effort you put in me. I really love this the method. I will continue to work hard at developing and improving. I hope one day I will make you proud of my accomplishment. I know I can do it.

Dear Bob, Thank you for the CD and for introducing me to the embouchure setting that has been a major step toward my recent improvement. The sound, and the ease of performance have been amazing. It was so very thoughtful of you to share your wonderful ideas with me. You have been so very helpful. Thank you, and I’m sorry that I cannot join you with Mike in NYC on Wednesday to see Lou Soloff. I’ll have to be in school that day. Be well…Harvey Samuels

How are you, great master of the rigid tongue? I am very busy in teaching now. Always coming new students, so my weekly regular program is more than 45 of them and especially the younger ones who start with tongue forward make astonishing progress. I have a lot of fun with them although at the end of a week I feel not really relaxed. But this is more mental fatigue, I couldn’t´ have done this program with my old (blowing) embouchure. It took a lot of time for me to come to that point that I can feel that all the spitting action happens in my mouth and is not made by my body (diaphragm etc.). My concentration is on this spot now. Sometimes in some stress situation, however I still feel some old reflexes want to get the rule but I am able now to eliminate this by thinking of some critical points finding the right way (in most cases).

So this is my short report for today. I am really looking forward to the new mouthpiece.

Many greetings from your Mannheim connection
Wolfgang and Angela

I’d like to thank you for the first lesson today. I really enjoyed it very much. Now I think I have a much deeper understanding of the mechanics of the TCE. You clarified my misunderstandings about the lip settings and a few other concepts.

Thank you very much!
-Yi

Thanks for a great lesson. This is to confirm that I will take my next lesson at 4:00 your time on Thursday, September 10, 2009. I was so worn out from trying to get all the court stuff done before our lesson today that I forgot to say much about the New York lesson. It was a wonderful experience. I would highly recommend it to anyone. I’m trying to get something up on the web and am just having a hard time getting all my notes and thoughts together, and regrettably, work has gotten extraordinarily busy so that I just forget some of the things that are important. Anyway, thanks again for the wonderful lesson in New York as well as today. I’ll see you via Skype on September 10 at 4:00 p.m. your time.

Dale Bode
skype

Hi Bahb,

Thank you for the lesson. It really helps having your book and your advice has really helped my confidence.

The ballet tour starts soon so I’ll be keeping my head down and mouth shut!! I will be in touch on a few weeks when I’m back.

Good luck with your trip.

All the best,

Jerry
skype

Hi Bahb,

I did the Meat Grinder last night. I’ve never done anything like it before. I was actually on my knees by the end of it. Chops feel much stronger today though!

Jerry
skype

Bahb,
Thanks so much for the great lesson today, you definitely clarified some concepts for me. I will be incorporating your suggestions, “prescriptions”, and concepts! Looking forward to working and developing the “GU” exercises. It was awesome to hear you play and demonstrate as well!! That’s the focus of sound and efficiency that I’m striving for. (You can hear it even on SKYPE). Moreover, the concept of playing to the mouthpiece and not trying to “fill the horn up” with air was one that really rings true. Safe travels to Europe.

I’ll keep in touch,

Best,
d.perrico
skype

I play cornet for fun in brass bands here in the UK. Last year I accidently stumbled accross Superchops / TCE and had a couple of great lessons with Jerry Callet whilst holidaying in New York. I had read favourable reviews of lessons with Bahb, and was attracted to the idea of video lessons via skype. I had my fifth lesson with Bahb last week – here’s a progress report so far.

Firstly let me say that not much of this would be possible without skype. Having the video link facility is just like having Bahb in the room with you. Also he can see what I am doing and make instant corrections and suggestions. There are a few technical glitches now and again and sometimes the connection can be dropped at busy times but hey, its free and quite new technology – non of this was even possible a couple of years ago. The other irritating thing about skype is that you can actually see the ease with which Bahb slouches at his desk and casually plays from double pedal c to super c !!!

Lesson 1 was mainly an introduction to the five articulations. Bahb took me through each in turn and explained the importance of each for strengthening the tongue. He emphasised the importance of the “gu” articulation to enable the tongue to be kept in the forward position. The “huff” articulation is useful to develop good legato playing. Bahb suggested lessons from the manual for me to try and I was reassured that I had understood the concept of TCE and had been progressing along the right lines. Just as the lesson was ending I asked “what about pedals, then? “. Another hour later I had a thorough understanding of the importance of playing double pedals in TCE. Yes I had known about the relaxing effects on the lips, but I didn’t appreciate their importance in building up the musculature.

Lesson 2 progressed from the first with more work on the articulations and more exercises from the manual.

Lesson 3 was quite a revelation. Bahb suggested that I was overblowing and had me exhaling much more before playing with the result that the sound improved almost straight away –with more focus and clarity of tone.

Lesson 4 had me working on range with Bahb introducing a simple scale exercise playing single notes from “g” above the staff to “c” but played pp. When these were sounding ok he had me playing two attacks on each note then four all still pp. Next I added the “d” then the “e”.

Lesson 5 was mainly taken up by further discussion of pedals. Bahb had me spitting multiple double pedals – these should be staccato and lound. We next worked on the transition from einsetzen to ansetzen – this I found very difficult at first, but Bahb explained it takes time to do this well and advised to keep doing the exercise.

So far I am very pleased with my progress over the last few months. I am slowly experiencing improvement with endurance, range and sound. Bahb is an excellent teacher and is always able to suggest just the right exercise to get over a particular problem. The lessons are informative but they are also great fun as well – which after all is what music is all about!

Regards
Paul
skype

Hello,from Endomender:
Since I had your ear, I want to catch you before you get away. I want to thank you for publishing this book and CD. I believe it is going to be of great benefit to my enjoyment of the trumpet.
Amateur Come Back player

Hi Bahb.
Thank you for a great lesson at your place. I had a real busy time in New York, but am now back in Norway. I have started to work on the TCE, and am very pleased about what you taught me. Your record is great. Trumpet sounds wonderful. Your playing is very good.
All the best, and good luck with your work!
Didrik

Great to see you the other week in Brussels. Here’s my progress report: Double pedals developed fairly quickly and now have a good, fat sound to them. Sliding back up to normal low range was the first sticking point and encouraged to set the tongue in a much more forward position; avoiding pulling back the tongue has been the main difficulty and, once again I, sliding up to mid-range notes with the same feeling took some time; Now, the tongue feels much more thick between the teeth with lips taking on much less of a part in changing registers. Sound is strong and centered ( I have given up on the off-center setting..you were right!!) and range is developing.

Just one question at this point. I can’t seem to always feel the top teeth with the tongue. Although I’m definitely setting between the teeth ?

Anyway I hope you are well and thanks once again for an inspirational lesson.

Laurence

Great minds think alike. I’ll be contacting soon about additional studies. As far as my understanding about TCE, I had no understanding of it before I experienced it for myself as a result of your instruction. I really feel as if you turned on a switch for me and I can’t go back to thinking about trumpet playing the way that I did previously.

Ray

Thanks for the fantastic lesson yesterday. I know I have a long way to go with the TCE, but at least I know that I will improve because I now have a definitive way to practice. I can’t believe that the proper way to practice double pedals was never really explained to me. Now I’m focused on attaining steady progress as a result of your excellent explanations. The tongue rules!

Musicalmente,
Ray

Had my second lesson with Bahb Civiletti . My first lesson was written up and discussed here.

Since October, I have been endeavoring to practice all of the basic exercises that Bahb had given me back in October – einsetzen/ansetzen, spit-buzz, tongue-anchored articulations from his TCE Training Manual, etc. I probably don’t practice nearly enough compared to a lot of the posters on this forum, since trumpet playing is a hobby for me, but since discovering TCE, I have been enjoying playing the horn more than ever. My range, while not nearly as consistent as I would like, has improved – I can pop out a G above high C fairly consistently. I couldn’t do anything above a high C with a regular mouthpiece before TCE – I was beginning to think my Xeno couldn’t slot high notes! I’m still not too developed on articulation, endurance, and sound presence, but I do like my overall quality of sound when I think I am using the TCE setup correctly.

It seemed to me that over the last few months since my first TCE lesson in October that I was getting off track, wondering if I was doing any of this stuff correctly. Fortunately, Bahb had a Florida trip in January. We were able to have the lesson in a recording studio in Orlando, which provided for us a very “dry” sound environment – ideal for evaluating my sound.

We began with focusing on the production of the spit-buzz. After playing a couple of scales, Bahb had me play a 1 page sheet of a basic staccato exercise (key of C, 16th notes, up and down the scale, interval jumps – kind of like an Arbans study) trying to create good popping attacks. Then Bahb said, “Play it up an octave.” My first thought was: What-? I can’t do that! But, as Bahb focused me on popping the notes and thinking about tongue compression, I was surprised to discover that I could pop out notes of E and F above high C in the exercise. I thought my spit-buzz attacks were pretty splatty, but Bahb commented that they improved throughout the lesson.

Then, Bahb played the exercise in the high octave.

It is difficult to describe Bahb’s sound in this dry recording studio room playing this exercise – the spit-buzz note pops were like hammer strikes of perfect trumpet sound. Clean, incredibly precise, centered and vibrant. I realize that most of the folks on this forum hear great trumpet sounds frequently, but it was quite a treat for me to hear a sound of such quality up close! Even better, it’s now in my head to compare to my ongoing development.

Bahb also had me play double pedals using the ansetzen to einsetzen. This was another improvement from my first lesson, where I couldn’t even produce a double pedal!

Towards the end our 2+ hours, I told Bahb that I could play a G above high C and wanted to show him. He asked if I “owned” the G. I replied that I don’t own it, but I can reach it. I played my G, and as I held it, Bahb picked up his horn and popped out a double high C. Now, THAT’S ownership. :-)

As with my first lesson, Bahb demonstrated a complete mastery of the horn, and a passion for explaining and demonstrating TCE. He definitely got me back on track with his concise, clear explanations and modeling of the TCE fundamentals. We also discussed his recent performances of the Bach Brandenberg concerto in Texas, and his upcoming recording project in Europe, where he will be performing concerti on the natural trumpet that are so extreme, Maurice Andre stated he would never perform them in public!

As I mentioned in my first lesson post, I was looking for Bahb to give me some good fundamentals training, as opposed to any musical literature interpretation and coaching. Even though I am a casual player, I am making a commitment this year to practice consistently, and to have frequent lessons with Bahb, either in person or through the Skype internet application. I’ll keep the forum updated on my progress.

Alex
Alexander W. Capsas

I had my first phone lesson (Skype) with Bahb yesterday. Best $35.00 ever spent on anything trumpet related. After a year of attempting this on my own, I’m kicking myself for not taking some lessons at the outset. I thought I was doing things mostly right and in need of some touch-up. In fact, I’ve been doing things mostly wrong. The books are good but do not replace a live teacher listening to you play and answering specific questions. Do yourself a favor – even if you’re only mildly considering trying TCE – take a lesson.

Best to all
Dave Little
skype

Just a quick note to let you know I arrived home safely last night. I wanted to thank you and Hortense again (very much!) for your time and graciousness to allow me to take a lesson in the middle of your vacation.

I will register and post a write-up of my lesson with you on the Trumpet Herald very soon – I need to think about how I will fit into the narrative the sight of you on your back on the couch kicking your legs in the air while playing double-high Cs.

As I said, this was the most gratifying, effective, educational, and astounding music lesson I have ever had. You did indeed hand me the Fire of Prometheus. My hope and prayer is that my efforts using it will lead to some better playing on my part!

Have a safe trip back home, and I’ll keep you updated on my progress.

Cordially,
Alex.
Alexander W. Capsas

The following narrative of my time spent with Bahb Civiletti is something I want to share with all of the folks here on this forum who are interested in the TCE approach to trumpet playing. I don’t have an agenda or preconceived notion about any of the particular methods discussed here on this site – I only wish to relate my recent experiences.

I played trumpet up through high school, and went to a junior college on scholarship, earning an Associate In Arts degree in trumpet performance. I was a good player technically, and could play in a variety of settings, but I was not a lead player, and my lack of range and power was always a source of frustration for me. So, I stopped playing trumpet and got a MBA.

When I picked up the horn again after a 20 year absence to play casually (mostly church), I was again experiencing the frustration with my sound, consistency, and range. Fortunately for me and my family, I am making a very good living doing something entirely different! Trumpet for me is now a hobby – I don’t need to play it ever again, and I was at a point where I just might have done that.

I stumbled across the TCE concept by randomly following a link to the review of Jerome Callet’s seminar at the recent ITG conference in New Jersey. Reading the description of Callet’s approach to trumpet playing and his personal history piqued my interest. Searching the internet yielded his website, Bahb’s site, and of course the Callet forum here at the Trumpet Herald. I called Mr. Callet and had an initial consultation. He gave me some exercises to work on, and we arranged a follow-up phone lesson, and I ordered and received the Trumpet Secrets book. The phone lesson was interesting, but it left me wanting more of a traditional in-person coaching session. After following the posts at the forum here, I began to wonder if I should also contact Bahb.

Several days ago I emailed Bahb inquiring about his clinics and lessons and about any plans to be in the southeast in the near future. Bahb responded back right away, and it so happened he was taking a week’s vacation in Boca Raton, Florida. (Only 240 miles from me!) When I suggested an extended afternoon lesson, he immediately agreed.

On Tuesday October 3rd I drove down to meet Bahb. After 4 ½ hours on the road, I arrived at Bahb’s Oceanside condo, not having had a formal music lesson for 20+ years, nervous as to what Bahb would try to teach, and if he would be able to help me. Bahb and Mrs. Civiletti were sitting by the pool when I arrived around 12:45p. My first impression of the couple was that they were very open, friendly, and gracious. Mrs. C left to do some shopping, and Bahb and I went into the condo, plunked down on a couple of couches, and pulled out our trumpets.

For the next 2 ½ hours, I sat astounded as Bahb conveyed a breadth and intensity of trumpet virtuosity, development, and knowledge that I had never experienced before.

Some vignettes from this incredible session:

  • Demonstrating the importance of the Einsetzen / Ansetzen approach to developing the fundamental TCE embouchure, and the basic sound articulations / attacks that develop the spit buzz;
  • Playing the piccolo trumpet parts of the Brandenburg concerto, twice, using a standard Bb trumpet. The first time soft, and the second time, as he put it, the “big band version [loud];”
  • Demonstrating the use of TCE compression vs. air volume and velocity by playing a loud D above double C with the tuning slide detached so that I could observe the minimal air flow;
  • Debunking all of the posture, air intake, and other trumpet myths for playing loud and high by rolling back on his couch and kicking his feet up in the air while playing double Cs;

All the while clearly conveying to me the key TCE fundamentals so that I could continue my development with a solid foundation. Throughout the lesson, Bahb communicated all of these things with passion, clarity, and good humor, checking constantly for my understanding of what he was explaining and demonstrating.

After the lesson, Bahb, Mrs. C, and I had lunch by the pool. Bahb continued to answer and discuss all of my follow up questions and comments – I felt I was still having an ongoing lesson with the experiences and observations that he shared. Around 5p, I realized I needed to get back on the road, and bade a reluctant goodbye to Bahb and his wife.

It is my hope and prayer that I can take these TCE fundamentals and use them to improve my trumpet playing. Bahb demonstrated with exceptional effectiveness that TCE works; the rest is up to me.

Alex Capsas

I too had a lesson with Bahb in Boca Raton just last night.

I would say that if you are interested in TCE then seeing Bahb is a great idea. I saw Jerry twice a few years ago. In contrast Bahb made things simple to understand and had me in the correct spit buzz position-something I was never quite sure I was doing right with Jerry.

If you want to see Jerry or have an opportunity, go for it. Then when you see Bahb you’ll get a slightly different take. One that involves more pedals (Einsetzen) and how this applies to the spit buzz position in the normal playing range (Ansetzen).

All in all, the lesson was informative, fun and I left with a very positive feeling; or as I told Bahb- enlightenment.

Doug

I had a great time during the lesson on Thursday. TCE is much more clear now. I know there is a lot of work to do, but already I have some interesting things happening with the chops.

Going through the first couple of pages with all of the articulations I feel the lips moving to a more focused, but less stressed position. I’m using the DT-10 mouthpiece because it sounds better and it feels bigger than it did before.

I can see the need for the isometric exercise you showed me. The grip feels weak, even though I can play above the staff a bit easier. That exercise is done with the teeth closed, right?

Thanks for all of your help.

Take care.
Doug Penovi

Hello BAHB,

There is a lot to say.

I like the cushion the rim gives but the edge into the cup feels to sharp to me. I like a rounder feel. I’ll have something put together for myself down the road.

So…I’m applying in earnest what you have explained to me. I’ve read the text and have been applying as much as I can to my daily routines, practice sessions, playing in general and am approaching the articulations using various cadences. I have to say that I was going to wait a full week before I wrote you. By Thursday I was in disbelief over the change developing in my range and tone. I wanted to wait to be sure it isn’t a fluke. A statement relates that TCE favors a shallow mouthpiece. I have been using a Schilke 6a4a for Pic work. I started working with it on the B flats. I’ve switched back and forth between the larger cups I have sometimes loosing track in my excitement of which was in what horn as either mouthpiece was working in my favor. Thursday evening I had a chance to put in considerable time. The tone just keep getting better, range was consistent, ( more than I ever had ) but most amazingly, and I know you’ll understand this, for the first time I had a sense of the inner / esoteric ear. The sound I was producing was the one in hear my head. Again on Saturday after an hour or so of noodleing I began to realize how open my set was. An epiphany if you will. I feel fresh after short periods of rest as well. Today, I played two masses, somewhat apprehensively due to the change. Into the second mass it all opened up. Directly after the mass I had a two hour session with a guitar player going over cover and standards. The clarity and power of a double G while playing around some changes got his attention. I think the best thing of all so far is how relaxed it feels. My older son, Aedan came into my studio yesterday evening after I had been at it for a while. Of course I asked him to listen for a bit. Being the stingy Scotsman he said “what a difference”. The kid than added how relaxed I looked and how easy I was playing. He has seen me make my head explode a few times.

Thanks,
Ed

I just wanted to tell you that I took a lesson with Bahb Civiletti yesterday on Skype. For those of you who don’t know who Bahb is he is the co-author of Trumpet Secrets, the bible of TCE and for those of you who don’t know what Skype is that is a free program that allows you to talk over the internet for free and with much more sound quality than ordinary phone calls.

I have to admit that I was a bit nervous because I have been studying TCE from the Trumpet Secrets and Bahb’s exercise manual for about a year without a teacher and I wondered if in fact I was doing nothing right. It was needless worrying, I think I’m on the right track. What I gained from this lesson was something I couldn’t possible get out of the books, namely to hear and be heard. Firstly: spit-buzzing. It’s almost mythical when you read about it in this forum, and spit-buzzing on the trumpet. It’s simply spitting and creating the sound in the front of the mouth, with the tongue anchored at the bottom lip. It’s not so complicated when you have a teacher at your side as I felt when Bahb was giving me tips in my headphones. Secondly Bahb was able to explain about his huff, as he calls it. It’s not a question of huffing and puffing, like the big, bad wolf, it’s just an exercise of articulation in the mouth as all articulation of TCE should be.

Bahb went over some other fundamental things and I feel now that I am much more able to go back to the exercises and do them the right way and get more results out of my limited practice time. The lesson was relaxed and focused and I highly recommend that those of you who are not able to get a lesson from Mr. Callet, Bahb or other qualified TCE teacher in person contact Bahb on his web site: www.tce-studio.com. It’s well worth it.

Play well and keep a positive attitude.
Steini.
skype

I took my second lesson with Bahb Civiletti on Skype yesterday and it was just as much fun and informative as the first one. I have been practicing his training manual and making a good progress but I nonetheless had a question for him about tone and how my tone, as many trumpeter find, gets narrow and thin in the upper register.

His answer was most interesting and he spent the whole lesson explaining to me about Einsetzen and Ansetzen that was originally invented for French Horn players in Germany who specialized in playing in either the low or high registers. This, as I understood it, was one of the key elements that got Jerome on the right track of inventing and developing TCE.

He had me do Double Pedal C and lower and than spit buzzing at that range. And then he had me sliding up from DP C to low C and spit buzzing C again. His explanations were most interesting but I am not going to try to go into details about this here, it’s not my place. Let me just say that this immediately resulted in better tone in my normal register, even less mouthpiece pressure and got me closer to the right set up for TCE.

I’m going to practice this in the next weeks and months, to strengthen my muscles and develop my tone but I have to say that his is very promising right away.

If you are thinking in the same way as I am that you want to improve your tone than I highly recommend that you get into contact with Bahb or Jerome. I just think this is one of the things you can not learn just from reading a text or a book. Listening tells you so much more, and as Bahb pointed out for me: Sound is the ultimate judge for the right set up.

Have a nice sound-day.
Steini.
skype

Over the weekend I got together with my old friend Bahb. I had not seen him in 25 years….on a New Years Eve gig in 1981.

When I was thirteen I was gigging with a local salsa band. On my first gig I was terrified because the first tune of the night had some high c’s in it and the regular lead player was out. Luckily, some guy named Bob Civiletti, was coming in to play lead. I asked him if he thought he could “handle it”…….At the time Bahb was playing lead for Tito Puente so lets just say the part was covered!

A few months later some of us kids got some scholarship money from our school fund and the band director, who was great friends with Mel Broiles, of the Metropolitan Opera, wanted us (3 players) to go see Mr. Broiles for these free lessons. Two of us boycotted the lessons with the guy from the Opera House……”We want to study with Bob”….”you have to hear this guy” we told the director. The band director just could not understand the decision we made and our stubbornness.

Eventually two of us went to study with Bahb and one went to Mel Broiles. The expression on the band directors face was priceless when a couple of weeks later he comes into the band room and hears me and the other Bahb student playing double pedals with the lower lip under the cup……while the Mel Broiles student beautifully articulated the first study from the Charlier book. He just looked at us and shook his head in disbelief. Better yet, about a month later the Broiles student switched over to the Bahb camp as our power was starting to really come thru.

Fast Forward 25 years:

I go to Bahb’s studio to talk trumpet while my wife and 6 year old son eat hot dogs at his Oktoberfest house party. When you enter his studio, you know that you have entered Bahb’s special place. There are all these historic instruments all over the room and music stands with books that you could tell have seen their fair share of study…….”where is the Secrets Book” I wondered.

Bob’s enthusiasm for TCE is so genuine. He taught this system many years ago to me, but now he knows the system so well that he is able to explain it in Simple terms…..that is the true sign of a great teacher-…..to make things simple for the student.

Bahb explained to me how our embouchure controls our playing….no need to get involved with posture, breathing and other complicated topics…..if nothing is happening in the embouchure your playing will always collapse under high demands. At this point Bahb startled me a bit when he laid down on his couch….put both legs up in the air…..and started playing double high C’s. Personally I have never been asked to play doubles high C’s while being in that position…..but the point was made very clearly!

Bahb asked me to take my horn out and play for him. After 30,000 hours of practicing since 1981, recording on many recordings and countless gigs…..well I just felt like I was 13 again……pretty weird.

Once I started playing Bahb new exactly were my tongue was positioned and why I would miss many notes. He knows everything that is going on within your chops to help you make an improvement. I found that I articulate this way when I am on gigs that require high powered playing….with Bahb’s explanations I could now play in that manner being knowledgeable about what I am doing correctly.

This system could get complicated if you do not have the right person guiding you. Bahb’s enthusiasm about teaching makes you want to learn…..he is even able to teach over the internet with the new “Skype” program.

For the modern trumpet, he currently plays on a Stage One “California Light” trumpet by NYTC that just sizzles with the intense sound that Bahb aims for himself and his students.

If you are looking for improvement in your playing please contact Bahb…….as I told my high school teacher 25 years ago “You have to hear this guy…..and he knows how to explain what he does”.

Oscar
skype

Thank you for the suggestion about pressing the lips together for 10 seconds at a time. It might not be much but m range increased by 2 note in just 1 week.

On your Portugal clinic video you mention how players consistently play with a duwa-duwa sound. This past Tuesday at brass band rehearsal the player behind me was warming up on a scale and all I could hear was duwa-duwa. Maybe I hear it because I don’t play that way any more.

Again, thank you for a great phone lesson.

Richard Hill